Dating adult film stars

A peacock appears on the island, with no clear explanation or motivation.

And the tango, a very un-Korean pasttime, makes a striking appearance in the film.

In Song's other works, such elements sometimes feel forced or self-consciously arty, but here they blend with the otherworldly presence of the island and add a sense of mystery.

Git (which means either a triangular flag or "feather" in Korean) is surprising in several respects.

One hopes that it will be liberated from the other two segments of 1.3.6. At 70 minutes, it is a perfectly respectable length for a stand-alone feature film, and this is a movie that deserves to travel.

(Darcy Paquet) There was a lot going on in the world of Korean film at the beginning of 2005.

In a year that has been lacking in unexpected discoveries, Git is an exciting find.

At its rousing premiere at the Green Film Festival in Seoul, a prominent Korean film critic told me it may be the best romance Korea has ever produced.

Whatever we feel about the character he portrays, Jang's performance is so real and natural that we can't help but be drawn to him.

Git centers around a film director who, in the middle of starting his next screenplay, remembers a promise he'd made ten years earlier.

While staying on a remote southern island off Jeju-do, he and his girlfriend of the time agreed to come back and meet at the same motel exactly ten years in the future.

This may have been what happened with Git by Song Il-gon, the director of Flower Island (2001), Spider Forest (2004), and various award-winning short films including The Picnic (1999).

Git was originally commissioned as a 30-minute segment of the digital omnibus film 1.3.6.

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