Sa couple dating

It is not known whether igo was a descendant of immigrants from the Visigothic court or was a local chief who imposed his leadership over time.Various references to Gascony in the early sources suggest that a Visigothic origin is unlikely.Apart from the Navarrese dynasties, these are the counts of Aragon, Pallars, Gascony and Toulouse, none of whom is recorded as related to the others in the male line.One possibility, therefore, is that the author of the Codex purposely separated his description of the two Navarrese dynasties, in the same way as his narrative concerning the other comital families, because they too were unrelated.As the text was written just over eighty years after the extinction of the Iiga dynasty, the authors of the Codex would have been well aware of the family connection if such a close one had existed.This, of course, assumes that the text of the Codex which has survived represents the complete version.Ibn Hayyn provides a completely different perspective, suggesting that the father of igo "Arista" was also named igo.There is no way of knowing whether this is simply a mistake in the source or whether Ibn Hayyn provides the correct answer to the conundrum.

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These are both shown in Part A of Chapter 1 of this document. However, at this distance in time, our knowledge of the families in question is so limited that it does not appear worthwhile to speculate with any degree of certainty about which hypothesis should be preferred over the other.

The Navarre region remained largely autonomous following the Muslim invasion of Spain, presumably explained by its geographical remoteness.

The Akhbar al-Majmua [Collection of Anecdotes, translated into Spanish in the mid-19th century by Lafuente as "Ajbar Machmua", dated to [940] by Chalmeta, although Lafuente dates it to the 11th century] records that "Okba ben Al-Hachaeh" [Uqba bin al-Hajaj al-Saluli, governor of Muslim Spain from [728, conquered territory as far as Narbonne and subjugated Galicia, lava and Pamplona. A below, a lord of Pamplona named Velasco Velsquez is recorded in an Arab source in 816.

This satisfies the chronological difficulty mentioned above in relation to the first explanation.

However, why would the authors of the Codex omit any reference to such an obvious relationship?

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These are both shown in Part A of Chapter 1 of this document. However, at this distance in time, our knowledge of the families in question is so limited that it does not appear worthwhile to speculate with any degree of certainty about which hypothesis should be preferred over the other.The Navarre region remained largely autonomous following the Muslim invasion of Spain, presumably explained by its geographical remoteness.The Akhbar al-Majmua [Collection of Anecdotes, translated into Spanish in the mid-19th century by Lafuente as "Ajbar Machmua", dated to [940] by Chalmeta, although Lafuente dates it to the 11th century] records that "Okba ben Al-Hachaeh" [Uqba bin al-Hajaj al-Saluli, governor of Muslim Spain from [728]], conquered territory as far as Narbonne and subjugated Galicia, lava and Pamplona. A below, a lord of Pamplona named Velasco Velsquez is recorded in an Arab source in 816.This satisfies the chronological difficulty mentioned above in relation to the first explanation.However, why would the authors of the Codex omit any reference to such an obvious relationship?

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